Posted in CBW2019, CCCC2019, History of Basic Writing, Mission Statement, Scholarship of Basic Writing, Uncategorized, What Is Basic Writing?

Towards a Position Statement on Basic Writing

This is draft text we are working on for a Statement on Basic Writing. We are seeking input into the principles, including action steps, questions, and summaries of information/knowledge/research.

Principle 1:

STUDENTS WHO PLACE INTO BASIC WRITING ARE INTELLECTUALLY CAPABLE, AND WE SHOULD RECOGNIZE AND VALUE THEIR HUMANITY AND INDIVIDUALITY, INCLUDING THEIR VOICES, EXPERTISE, EXPERIENCE, LANGUAGES, AND IDENTITIES.

Principle 2:

BASIC WRITING IS NOT A PRECURSOR TO LEGITIMATE ACADEMIC WORK; THEREFORE, STUDENTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO EXPERIENCE BASIC WRITING AS VALUABLE IN ITS OWN RIGHT.

Principle 3:

BASIC WRITING IS ROOTED IN A HISTORY OF SOCIAL JUSTICE; THEREFORE, WE MUST CONTINUE TO ADVOCATE FOR ACCESS TO HIGHER EDUCATION FOR ACADEMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS.

Principle 4:

BASIC WRITING IS A RESEARCH-BASED DISCIPLINE WITH AN EVOLVING SCHOLARLY HISTORY, AND ITS TEACHERS MUST BE REFLECTIVE PRACTITIONERS ENGAGED IN PEDAGOGICAL RENEWAL.

Principle 5:

BASIC WRITING COURSES SHOULD ENGAGE STUDENTS IN READING AND WRITING AS SOCIAL, CONTEXTUAL, MEANING-MAKING ACTIVITIES.

Suggested Changes In Today’s Session

http://www2.ncte.org/statement/secondlangwriting/

http://www2.ncte.org/statement/21stcentframework/

What is our goal here?

Statement for admins?

Statement for BW instructors?

Best practices for TEACHING vs. Best practices for HIRING? Both? Neither?

Preamble: precarity

Three moves in the polemical preamble–1st claim our origin story as radical democracy and opportunity for students, 2nd to own our own positionality, and to transition to our principles

What do we MEAN by Basic Writing?

The Council of Basic Writing Statement of Ethos and Principles

Basic Writing is a pedagogical program designed to empower students who have been failed by racist and classist structures in education. Basic Writing grows out of the ideal of democratic equitable education–an ideal meant to provide accessible opportunities for all people.

The Council of Basic Writing understands that Basic Writing is a fraught and imperfect enterprise. Given the decades-long underfunding of education and neoliberal logics dominating educating, conditions in institutions, the classroom, and in society are even more precarious. The Council of Basic Writing refuses to capitulate to notion that there is no value in developmental education. Instead, we see the work of teaching underprepared writers as a direct challenge to these structures.

BW is an important way to address generational inequalities and promote access to higher education but we should not that BW can also be used to perpetuate inequalities and limit access to higher education.

We recognize Basic writing as a site with the most vulnerable students with the most vulnerable teachers. Basic Writing students are vulnerable in the sense that they often come from majority minority communities, use varieties of English that are not privileged and are denigrated. Basic writing students are often first-generation students and students affected by adverse socio-economic conditions. Basic writing students face racist and classist structures and assessment practices. Basic writing teachers are vulnerable in the sense that they often receive less professionalization and are frequently contingent.

Basic Writing instruction must include anti-racist and critical pedagogies. Basic writing must be driven by research-based best practices and the mission of these programs must recognize the social justice implications of our work.

Where does BW live? Dual enrollment/ALP/etc.

We recognize Basic writing as a site with the most vulnerable students with the most vulnerable teachers.

Basic Writing students are vulnerable in the sense that they often come from majority minority communities, use varieties of English that are not privileged and are denigrated. Basic writing students are often first-generation students and students affected by adverse socio-economic conditions. Basic writing students face racist and classist structures and assessment practices.

Basic writing teachers are vulnerable in the sense that they often receive less professionalization and are frequently contingent.

Here in the preamble, we need to define BW as opposed to “remediation” and “basic writing” and “developmental writing.” (and developmental English)

CONTINGENT labor–how do we address the labor conditions of BW faculty

Add the adjunct faculty data!

Language–Edits

Principle I: STUDENTS WHO are PLACEd INTO BASIC WRITING ARE INTELLECTUALLY CAPABLE, AND WE SHOULD RECOGNIZE AND VALUE THEIR HUMANITY AND INDIVIDUALITY, INCLUDING THEIR VOICES, EXPERTISE, EXPERIENCE, LANGUAGES, AND IDENTITIES.  

[trying to take a less defensive posture for Principle I?) →    We should recognize and value the humanity and individuality–including their voices, expertise, experience, languages, intelligences, and identities — of students who enroll in basic writing courses.

Principle II: BASIC WRITING IS NOT A PRECURSOR TO LEGITIMATE ACADEMIC WORK; THEREFORE, STUDENTS SHOULD BE ABLE TO EXPERIENCE BASIC WRITING AS VALUABLE IN ITS OWN RIGHT.

Principle III:BASIC WRITING IS ROOTED IN A HISTORY OF SOCIAL JUSTICE; THEREFORE, WE MUST CONTINUE TO ADVOCATE FOR ACCESS TO HIGHER EDUCATION FOR ACADEMICALLY DISADVANTAGED STUDENTS.

Principle IV:BASIC WRITING IS A RESEARCH-BASED DISCIPLINE WITH AN EVOLVING SCHOLARLY HISTORY, AND ITS TEACHERS MUST BE REFLECTIVE PRACTITIONERS ENGAGED IN PEDAGOGICAL RENEWAL.

Principle V:BASIC WRITING COURSES SHOULD ENGAGE STUDENTS IN READING AND WRITING AS SOCIAL, CONTEXTUAL, MEANING-MAKING ACTIVITIES.

Notes from Today’s Session on these proposed principles–from our discussion

  1. Should principle 4 be a subset of principle 2?
  2. Preamble: thinking about having it be a political preamble–should we do this work / continue this work — we need to take on those preconceptions and the basis and foundation for basic writing as a radical part of open admissions pedagogy–also issues of dual vulnerability–students and faculty
  3. Preamble: claiming and enacting principles based on this
  4. Question about language: can we say democratic, access inclusive
  5. Principle 2 is defensive (as written): suggestions for writing it more positively–see photos below.
  6. Focus: we should not be defensive in our language
  7. Principle 4 should be a subset of principle 2
  8. Discussion of adjunct/contingent labor/non-tenure-track labor–need to make sure that we are supporting fair labor conditions AND pointing to adjunct/contingent labor/non-tenure-track–question about linking it to this work that already exists: https://cccc.ncte.org/cccc/resources/positions/working-conditions-ntt
  9. Principle 5: justification of how basic writing studies should proceed / how basic writers make up a large component of what we do, but it makes up a smaller amount of the scholarship
  10. Principle 5: basic writing research should not be to fix students. It should be to understand who they are and how they compose
  11. Principle 5: we need to be aware of the social cultural that the research must be ethically bound to address
  12. Principle 5: students should be actively engaged in the research and design
  13. Principle 5: where could basic writing of the future lend a hand? Distance learning; recognizing how mental health is playing a role; tracking basic writers in their lives beyond the classroom and supporting them beyond the composition classroom
  14. Clarify that students who place into basic writing might still benefit from additional types of support
  15. Economic arguments around courses
  16. Principle 1: students who enroll instead of place
  17. Principle 1: “intellectually capable”–name the way students are capable
  18. Principle 1: look at WPA statement
  19. What types of calls for research?
  20. They are basic in a particular way
  21. Deserving of equal scholarly attention
  22. These writers operate from a different knowledge base

Additional Notes & Edits (from the wall)

Small Group Work

Next Steps:

We will circulate this on the Facebook page, on the Blog, and on CBW-L for comments and feedback.

Posted in Uncategorized

Teaching Students How to Perform Science Writing

Robby Nadler explores Basic Writers in Science

The next session highlight the 2018 INNY Award Winners: Robby Nadler and Lindsey Harding presented the work they did with Christy Desmet, Kris Miller, & Kimberly Brown’s work on curriculum development at the University of Georgia in helping introductory biology students learn to write for science.

The presentation examined the collaboration between UGA’s Division of Biology, First-year Composition, and the Writing Intensive Program. They examined writing gaps in transferring writing skills between the humanities and the sciences, specifically biology, developing a specific curriculum to address the gaps they discovered.

They focused on teaching for transfer, peer review, citations, the use of source material in science (different from in the humanities), writing abstracts, word banks, with students. With faculty and graduate learning assistants, they focused on five minute mini-lessons (5MT).

Participants were invited to sketch out a 5MT and share it in small groups. Group one focused on integrating sources into student writing. Group 2 focused on understanding the conventions of the genre.

More about the INNY Award

https://cbwblog.wordpress.com/the-inny-award/

Posted in Uncategorized

E01: Collaboration, Community, Caucusing

For some reason, our usual Thursday night SIG was turned into a Friday 8am meeting-we aren’t sure why- and hope we will be back to our traditional schedule next year… but in the meantime about 25 people made it to the furthest reaches of the Convention Center to talk about Basic Writing this morning.

We started the morning by awarding the CBW Award for Innovation “The Inny” to Robby Nadler at the University of Georgia for his program on Basic Science Writing.

Robby shared his program with us and was set to share the success of the program later in the day at a C’s session. He was also kind enough to bring early morning donuts to our meeting! An unexpected but much needed surprise!

After the INNY presentation and discussion Jason Evans led us through small group discusses around placement, the integration of reading and writing, assessment and policy issues. Groups all shared a synopsis of their discussion and we all went our separate ways. Until next year CBW!

Watch this space for exciting ways to interact around Basic Writing issues in the next months!

Posted in CBW 2018, CBW Exec Board, Uncategorized

Interested in Basic Writing at 4C’s 2018?

Give these sessions a try!

Basic Writing Sessions at C’s

(as identified in the program by #BW)

Please refer to the Program Book or App for locations 

Thursday, 10:30-11:45am

A.09 The Un-Research Project: Turning the Research Process Upside Down

A.19 Using Technology in the Classroom: Attitudes, Labor, and Transformation

A.21 Labor, Embodiment, and Embeddedness in Accelerated Learning Programs

Thursday, 12:15-1:30

B.15 Toward Equity: An Exploration of Academic Roles in Corequisite Courses

B.47 Is This My Class? Placement in First-Year Composition

Thursday, 3:15-4:30

C.09 Theorizing Work in Peer Review

C.46 I Can’t Go for That: Basic Writing, Standard English and the Language We Use

Poster Session: Ready, Set, Go! Dual-Enrollment Composition Students’ Writing Experiences and Self-Efficacy for Writing

Thursday, 4:45-6:00

D.11 Bridging the Gap: Developing College/High School

Transition Courses

D.32 Examining Feedback: Favored Traits, Question-Based Lessons, and Online Assignments

D.35 Getting Over Ownership: Blurring the Labor and Pedagogy for Composition/Creative Writing

Poster Session: On the Outside, Looking In: Affective Practices of First-Generation College Students in the Writing Classroom

Poster Session: Transferring In: Exploring the Values and Language of High School to College Writing Transitions

Poster Session: OneNote: Revision and Reinvention

Thursday, 6:30-7:30 SIGs

TSIG.08 Network of Directed Self Placement—Changing

Assessment & Placement Practices

TSIG.19 Languaging Grammar, Grammaring Language:

Progressive Approaches to Grammar in the Writing Classroom

Friday, 8:00-9:15am

*****E.01 Council of Basic Writing Meeting: Collaboration, Community, Caucusing

E.41 Self-Efficacy as Transformation: Four Studies on Working with Student Writers to Help Them Believe in Themselves

Friday, 9:30-10:45am

F.18 Understanding and Addressing the Language Challenges of Academic Writing: What New Language Studies Show

F.19 Writing about Writing at the Community College: Transforming Practices for Diverse Student Populations

F.25 Mindfulness Writing: Innovations in Reflective Writing

F.29 Promoting Reflexive Reading Practices in the Writing Classroom

Individual Presentations 9:30-10:45am

Kansas City Marriott Downtown: Jay McShann B

F-IP.04 The Trouble with Translingualism: Instructor Ideology vs. Student Agency

F-IP.05 Context, Access, Identity: On Mainstreaming Adjuncts Like Basic Writers

F-IP.06 Transforming the Conversation of Laboring at the Two-Year College, OR Why I Love Teaching the One Course That Everybody Must Take but Nobody Really Wants to Take, or Teach!

Friday, 11:00-12:15pm

G.27 Reconsidering Course Design: Doing Ethnography, Reading Texts, and Keeping Commonplace Books

Friday, 12:30-1:45pm

H.08 How They See Themselves: Learning from Students’ Self-Perceptions as (Non)Writers/(Non)Revisors

H.12 Inclusive Pedagogies: A Framework for Redesigning Writing Programs to Support Access and Retention

H.36 Languaging in Sites of Writing: Three Case Studies across Two Universities

H.49 Building Purposeful Infrastructure around Extended Basic Writing Programs

Poster Session: Implementing Corequisite FYC Models at the HSI Two-Year College

Poster Session: Secondary-Collegiate Connections: Promoting Knowledge Transfer in First-Year Composition

Friday, 2:00-3:15pm

I.10 Over the Load: Revisiting the Labors of Assessment

I.18 Here to Dance: An HBCU Arrives at the Writing Center Party

I.44 The Unexpected Transformative Power of a Mandated Corequisite

Friday, 3:30-4:45

J.38 Demystifying Academic Research Genres through Rhetorical Analysis

Friday SIG 5:00-6:00pm

FSIG.09 Teachers of Adult Learners in Diverse Contexts

Saturday 9:30-10:45am

K.07 Transforming the Labor of Feedback

K.31 Bridging the Gap: Building Ethical Awareness across Institutional Sites

K.35 Seeking Justice for Basic Writing and English Language Administration through Networked Theories

Saturday, 11:00am-12:15pm

L.14 Not Just Text-to-Text: Incorporating “Outside” Perspectives, a Translingual Framework, and Non-Linguistic, Material Ecologies in Languaging Work

Saturday Workshop

SW.06 Reimagining Plagiarism as Educational Opportunity: A Transformative Workshop

Posted in Uncategorized

The CBW Needs Three New Voices for CCCC 2017

Dear Graduate Students, Advisors, and Professors in Composition:

At CCCC 2017, the Council on Basic Writing will be considering the future of Basic Writing as both a field of teaching and a field of research. In order to help us consider the future, we will be using the CBW’s sponsored session to highlight the work of graduate students in our field. We will be selecting three presenters from applicants and will invite these students to take the stage of one of our major events of the year. Any graduate student who is working on issues pertinent to Basic Writing studies is eligible to apply, though we recommend that you have some familiarity with the field. Once selected, students will be paired with a long time CBW member and scholar of Basic Writing for mentorship on their work before it is presented on a major stage. Presenters will then present their work at the CBW Sponsored Session “Emerging Voices in Basic Writing Studies” on Thursday morning from 10:30-11:45. Presenters will also be invited to the CBW pre-conference workshop and to our Thursday evening SIG meeting so that they can learn about how the CBW might become a resource in their professional lives. Unfortunately, there is no CBW funding for participants’ travel .

In order to apply, please send the following materials via email to Michael Hill, mdhill1@hfcc.edu, by January 9, 2017:

  1. A brief letter of application introducing yourself, your interest in Basic Writing, and your work.
  2. A 250 word abstract of the work you intend to present. This abstract should give some indication of your presentation style and of your research/argument.
  3. A letter of reference from a professor or advisor in the field that both recommends you as a presenter and verifies your status as a graduate student.

Either your letter of application or letter of reference should also promise that you will be able to attend CCCC 2017 if you are selected.

If you have any questions about this session or the requested materials, please contact Michael Hill at the email address above. You can also Tweet your question to @4cCBW.

Posted in Uncategorized

Official CBW Events at CCCC

Here is your guide to every official Council on Basic Writing session at CCCC 2016.  Please try to attend one or more of these sessions in order to help us continue to build the CBW as an institutional force at CCCC.  A guide to other Basic Writing sessions is forthcoming.

4/6               9:00-5:00     W.05  CBW Workshop                Hilton Room 335 C, Level 3

“The Transformative Action of Basic Writing”

This year’s all-day workshop will explore how the lives of students and instructors intersect with their institutions and communities to demand basic writing action that fosters social justice. Throughout the day, we will consider how the practice of BW affirms student lives and respects student agency while fostering collective action amongst BW researchers and instructors.

4/7               1:45-3:00    TSIG.11 CBW Business Meeting             Hilton Room 344A, Level 3

“CBW Business Meeting”

The Council on Basic Writing, a standing group of CCCC, invites all members of the CBW and all interested parties to attend the first public meeting of the CBW Executive Board. Agenda items for this meeting will include reviewing the CBW mission, membership, and annual goals; discussing annual awards; planning for the annual CCCC workshop; electing new board and committee members; and electing a new co-chair of the CBW. Member and audience commentary will be welcome; voting will be limited to board members.

4/7               4:45-6:00     E.06  CBW Sponsored Session      Hilton Ballroom of the                                                                                                                              Americas, Salon E, Level 2

“Shaping the Field, Shaping the Community, Shaping the Classroom:  The Council on Basic Writing at 35”

The Council on Basic Writing (CBW) is thirty-five. Where have we been? How has the field changed? How has the CBW helped to navigate those changes? Where is the field going? How will CBW be part of the shifting field? In this roundtable discussion, we invite six former chairs of the CBW to reflect on the past, present, and future of basic writing in general and the CBW in particular, based on their experiences of guiding the CBW through new steps of development and through institutional and cultural challenges to both the organization and the field.

4/7               6:30-7:30         TSIG.02  CBW Sig                   GRB Room 351C, Level 3

“CBW SIG:  Contemplating Action in the Classroom, Institution, State, Nation”

The Council on Basic Writing hosts this Special Interest Group for basic writing teachers and anyone who is concerned about access to higher education. This meeting will focus on the reciprocal interactions of pedagogy and policy. Participants are encouraged to bring assignment ideas and teaching strategies as material for sharing and as a starting point for conversations regarding how Basic Writing instructors can use pedagogy to affirm, shape, and explore policy.

Posted in Uncategorized

New CBW Twitter Account

The CBW has a new Twitter account. We will be using this account to make announcements, publicize events, share BW news, and to make occasional statements in support of BW. Please follow us: @4cCBW.

If you’re going to be at CCCC this year and if you Tweet about any BW discussions, please include @4cCBW in your tweet.

We look forward to connecting with you.