Posted in CBW2019, CCCC2019, Resources

Resources Recommended During CBW 2019

Books

Daniel Heath Justice’s Why Indigenous Literatures Matter (Indigenous Studies)

Kelly Ritter’s Before Shaughnessy: Basic Writing at Yale and Harvard, 1920-1960 (Studies in Writing and Rhetoric)

John Warner’s Why They Can’t Write: Killing the Five-Paragraph Essay and Other Necessities

Asao B. Inoue’s Antiracist Writing Assessment Ecologies: Teaching and Assessing Writing for a Socially Just Future

https://www.amazon.com/Antiracist-Writing-Assessment-Ecologies-Assessing/dp/1602357730

Technologies

Zoom, Screencastomatic & Jing for screen casting

Key Articles Referenced During the Day

Beam, Sara N. and Holly Clay-Buck. “Low-Spoon Teaching: Labor, Gender, and Self-Accommodation in Academia.” Tulsa Studies in Women’s Literature, vol. 37, no. 1, 2018, pp. 173-180.

Brueggemann, Brenda Jo. “An Enabling Pedagogy: Meditations on Writing and Disability.” JAC, vol. 21, no, 4, 2001, pp. 791–820.

Elbow, Peter, “A Unilateral Grading Contract to Improve Learning and Teaching [co-written with Jane Danielewicz]” (2008). College Composition and Communication. 3.
Retrieved from https://scholarworks.umass.edu/eng_faculty_pubs/3

Miserando, Christine. “The Spoon Theory.” But You Dont Look Sick? Support for Those with Invisible Illness or Chronic Illness, 26 Apr. 2013, butyoudontlooksick.com/articles/written-by-christine/the-spoon-theory/.

Strategies

Predecessor’s materials (when you are an administrator): what can you learn? What can you reuse?

Programs/Models

ALP: Accelerated Learning Program (there are many models, but Community College of Baltimore County is the model and program that generated the ALP model and trained many of the campuses using ALP in the U.S.)

http://alp-deved.org

UDL: Universal Design for Learning

http://www.cast.org/our-work/about-udl.html#.XIlPCy2ZPOQ

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Posted in Accessibility, CBW Exec Board, CBW2019, CCCC, CCCC2019, Teaching, Tech

Lean On Me: Self-Accommodation and Teaching with Disabilities

The amazing Sara Webb-Sunderhaus generously made her entire keynote presentation, “Lean on Me: Self-Accommodation and Teaching with Disabilities” available on Scribd (link below).

I hope you’ll read her full talk. This is an amazing story and journey. Sara’s brave story touches on: mindful teaching, abundant self-care, questions about identity, changing identity, the role and load of writing program administrators, disclosing impairments to students, feminism, the whole self, vulnerability, and a call to think about how to structure work in ways that allow you to do your best work–whatever that means at a given time in your life.

A few quotes from Sara’s talk that really spoke to me:

“I vividly remember thinking that one moment had changed my life in ways I did not yet understand…”

“Over the past year and a half, I have struggled to come to terms with a changing identity, sense of self, and expectations.
Today I’d like to talk with you about what this process has been
like. Specifically, I will discuss the impact of my disability on my teaching, the types of resources I have needed and continue to need, and how I have learned to practice self-accommodation as I continue to come to terms with the ways my life has changed over the past 18 months.”

“If I had been an adjunct, with no health insurance, there is no doubt I would have had to declare bankruptcy. But I was not an adjunct—I was a tenured associate professor, with a great deal of sick time, supportive colleagues, and a caring chair. All of these factors were critical resources as I adjusted to my new reality.”

“What I have had to learn this academic year — and what I am still in the process of learning — is how to implement low-spoon theories of writing program administration and teaching and make use of the resources available to me. I refer here to Christine Miserandino’s spoon theory, which uses spoons as metaphors for energy.”

“Self-accommodation is an intensely important and woefully overlooked academic practice, especially for women,” adding that “it is directly at odds with America’s culture of ruthless self-reliance and ‘toughing it out,’ with women’s perceptions of self-worth being tied to usefulness, with expectations of female availability, and with our own (often founded) fears of appearing ‘weak’ or less capable than male colleagues” (173).”

“It forced me to become comfortable with accepting help and relying on others when appropriate, and it made me explore why I had such a fear of being a burden to others. I have learned — and am still learning — that it is okay to ask for help when I need it. That does not mean that I am over-reliant on others or not doing my job. I do not have to constantly prove to myself that I am strong or independent, because I know that I am all of those things; accepting a dear colleague’s help does not lessen me in any way.”

“I’ve now reached a place where it feels like a responsibility, not a burden, to disclose my disability to students. I want all students to know that people who at first glance may appear “able bodied” may not be. I want students— both those with disabilities and those without — to know that being born with or acquiring a disability may change someone’s life, but it doesn’t necessarily have to change their goals and ambitions.”

“I will never be able to work in the same ways I did before, because I live in crip time now. That is okay — more than okay — to admit. I still sometimes feel embarrassed to have these conversations with students, but without exception they have been kind and generous. I hope that sharing my vulnerabilities with them has led to a classroom environment in which they feel can be vulnerable, and I know I feel closer to this particular group of students than I ever have by this point in a semester. My students have helped me reach a point of self-acceptance, and I am grateful to them for that.”

During the Q&A Session, participants shared experiences, strategies, and questions such as:

–it’s difficult to file for accommodations; many people don’t file for accommodation

–vulnerability

–disclosure

–invitation to join the CCCC Standing Group for Disability Studies

Please read the full text of Sara’s talk here:

https://www.scribd.com/document/401544701/Lean-on-Me-Self-Accommodation-and-Teaching-with-Disabilities

Posted in CBW2019, CCCC2019, Professional Developmwnt, Scholarship of Basic Writing, Teaching, What's New in Basic Writing

Updated Schedule for the CBW Workshop at CCCC 2019 (3/13/2019)

Please join us for an exciting day discussing Basic Writing and composition. We look forward to this annual gathering to network, share ideas, and explore Basic Writing pedagogy & theory.

This year, CBW is featured as a strand in the all-day TYCA conference. So, if you have registered for the TYCA conference (or just for the TYCA lunch), you can attend CBW sessions or—better yet—join us for the whole day!

If you prefer, you can also register for CBW all day long, just like you have in the past!

Posted in CBW2019, CCCC2019, Scholarship of Basic Writing, Teaching

Want to Present at CBW 2019?

“Inside Our Classrooms: Basic Writing Today” will highlight the work of scholars of color

The CBW has a long-standing commitment to racial justice and inclusivity. As such, we are designating a portion of our program to highlighting the work of scholars of color, with particular emphasis on newer scholars in a poster session focused on classroom pedagogy.

Interested in presenting? Please send a 100-200 word proposal to lclark@lagcc.cuny.edu. Please use the subject line “Inside Our Classrooms” CBW 2019 Proposal.

  1. In your proposal, please describe your work in Basic Writing with a special emphasis on your classroom pedagogy. How would you highlight and share this work in a poster session? Proposals need not present a program-wide perspective (although that is welcome). We are interested in what you’re doing in your classrooms today!
  2. Let us know if this would be your first presentation at CBW/CCCC.
  3. Please make sure to include contact information and institutional affiliation.

Accepted proposals will be featured in a poster session at CBW 2019 on Wednesday, 13 March 2019 during our preconference workshop at CCCC 2019.

Please feel free to touch base with questions before sending in your proposal!

Deadline: 2/15/19


Posted in CCCC, CCCC2019, What's New in Basic Writing

CBW 2019 Is On The Way!

As we get ready for CBW 2019, CBW Board Members share what they are most excited about this year!

Marisa Klages, our co-chair is looking forward to connecting with colleagues.

Jason Evans says, “I’m looking forward to a chance to think constructively about basic writing with colleagues from across the country, the first-ever TYCA national conference, and a conference program shaped by Vershawn Young!”

Bill Lalicker says, “At CCCC 2019, we come together to recognize the intellectual and rhetorical gifts bestowed by our students of every color and gender and origin and identity, and to discover new ways to support their voices.”

Susan Naomi Bernstein says, “I am most looking forward to connecting with colleagues.”

J. Elizabeth Clark says, “CCCC 2019 is going to be a wonderful opportunity to focus on teaching in two year institutions as TYCA inaugurates its first pre-conference workshop. We’re looking forward to the cross over between CBW and TYCA with lots of new participants! I’m also jazzed about our poster sessions and learning from new scholars and teachers!”